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Alessandro Sette, Dr.Biol.Sci.
Professor
Center for Autoimmunity and Inflammation, Center for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research
"New infectious agents originate all the time dating back to the plague in the siege of Athens in the 7th century to the endemic flu in 1918 that killed 20 million people. For medical science, it’s a perennial race between new infectious diseases coming up and society reacting to them, understanding them and ultimately defeating them."

Overview

Dr. Alessandro Sette has devoted more than 35 years of study towards understanding the immune response, measuring immune activity, and developing disease intervention strategies against cancer, autoimmunity, allergy, and infectious diseases. The laboratory is defining in chemical terms the specific structures (epitopes) that the immune system recognizes, and uses this knowledge to measure and understand immune responses.

The Sette lab’s approach uses epitopes as specific probes to define the immune signatures associated with productive/protective immunity versus deficient immunity/immunopathology. This research will improve understanding of how the body successfully battles infection, and conversely, how pathogens escape the immune system, causing the individual to succumb to disease. Because of the laboratory’s success in its study of immune response, Sette and his team believe their research will lead to development of new therapeutic and prophylactic approaches to fighting infectious diseases. In this area, Dr. Sette’s disease focus has shifted over the years from HIV, HBV and HCV to emerging diseases and diseases of potential biodefense concern to, most recently, diseases and pathogens relevant to worldwide global health, including SARS-CoV-2, Dengue, Zika, Chikungunya, malaria, M. tuberculosis, B. pertussis, and shingles. Furthermore, Dr. Sette’s team has adapted the methods and techniques developed in the context of infectious disease to understand the T cell response to common allergens and to discover a cell component in Parkinson’s Disease.

Finally, Dr. Sette has overseen the design and curation efforts of the national Immune Epitope Database (IEDB), a freely available, widely used bioinformatics resource, since its inception in the early 2000s. The IEDB catalogs all epitopes for humans, non-human primates, rodents, and other vertebrates, from allergens, infectious diseases, autoantigens and transplants, and includes epitope prediction tools to accelerate immunology research around the world.

Featured publications

Aug 4, 2020 Science
Selective and cross-reactive SARS-CoV-2 T cell epitopes in unexposed humans
Mateus J, Grifoni A, Tarke A, Sidney J, Ramirez SI, Dan JM, Burger ZC, Rawlings SA, Smith DM, Phillips E, Mallal S, Lammers M, Rubiro P, Quiambao L, Sutherland A, Yu ED, da Silva Antunes R, Greenbaum J, Frazier A, Markmann AJ, Premkumar L, de Silva A, Peters B, Crotty S, Sette A, Weiskopf D.
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Lab Members

AA
JB
NB
ZB
MB
KC
SC
TE
GF
AF
CK
ML
JM
NM
EM
KM
LQ
PR
BS
AS
DS
JS
AS
AT
RV
HV
EW
DW
EY
LZ

Research Projects

Sette
Allergy

Cockroach Allergy: The Sette lab is working to identify the sites on allergen molecules that trigger an inflammatory immune response.

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Sette
Athlerosclerosis

ATHEROSCLEROSIS Working in collaboration with LJI Professor Klaus Ley, the Sette Lab aims to help develop vaccines that target inflammatory

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Sette
Dengue Virus

The Sette lab’s previous large scale epitope identification efforts (supported by HHS contracts) have led to a deeper understanding of

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Vijayanand/Sette/Peters
Human Immune Profiling Consortium

The aim of this work, in collaboration with Bjoern Peters, Ph.D., and Pandurangan Vijayanand, M.D., Ph.D., is to characterize the

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Sette
Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource Program

A collaboration with LJI Professor Alessandro Sette, Dr. Biol. Sci, to maintain and further develop the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) and associated

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Sette
Other Diseases – Sette

Varicella Zoster Virus: Research into the longevity of vaccine-induced immunity to varicella zoster virus, the pathogen that causes chicken pox

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more research projects

From the lab

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